Index Post

TABLE OF CONTENTS

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. Please review the page How and Why We Use Quotes.

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NACOS 0.1 PREFACE: “Our pre-class discussion will happen on Facebook …”

NACOS 0.1 PREFACE: “Our pre-class discussion will happen on Facebook …”
Congregational Care 323 – Native American Course of Study
Director: Rev. Dr. Michelle Oberwise Lacock

Navigating these posts:
In the top and bottom right hand corners of each post you will see links to move to the next post in the sequence. (WordPress blog posts are in reverse order – the last one is on top and the first one is at the bottom.)
Each is numbered in order.
Click on these links to begin reading in order in each section:

Preface – Getting Organized (This post – 1 of 4)
NACOS 0.1 PREFACE: “Our pre-class discussion will happen on Facebook …”
https://ambidextrouschurch.com/2020/12/01/nacos/

Understanding personal and congregational loss. (1 of 3)
NACOS 1.1 Understanding personal loss.
https://ambidextrouschurch.com/2020/12/01/nacos-1-1-1-1-understanding-personal-loss/

William Worden’s Four Tasks of Mourning (1 of 5)
NACOS 2.1: Worden’s first task, which is to “Accept the Reality of the Loss.”
https://ambidextrouschurch.com/2020/12/01/nacos-2-1/

NACOS 3.1: Peter Senge’s Limits to Growth systems archetype (1 of 1)
https://ambidextrouschurch.com/2020/12/01/nacos-3-1-senges-limits-to-growth-systems-archetype-2/

The Diffusion of Innovations Adopter Framework. (1 of 8)
NACOS 4.1: A Parable: The Stainless Steel Church
https://ambidextrouschurch.com/2020/12/01/nacos-4-1-a-parable-the-stainless-steel-church/

Instructor for the 12/13 Session – Contact information:
David O Kueker (pronounced “key-ker”)
dkueker@yahoo.com
Cell: 618-780-0151 (phone or text)
Facebook: David Oliver Kueker

Prior to our discussion on December 13, I wanted to be able to introduce the concepts for our discussion and give you an experiential opportunity to work with them in the week prior to our Zoom meeting. We’ll have that “discussion before the class discussion” on our class Facebook page.

Where does this material originate?
My Fuller Theological Seminary 2008 Doctor of Ministry project sought to bring an understanding of 3rd world “lay driven” cell church methods of evangelism and disciple making to small Midwestern United Methodist congregations of 100 or less in average attendance. This material is drawn from the chapter written to address congregational resistance to these new methods. The entire project is available to you to read after our class concludes, but it isn’t necessary for our class time at all.

Our pre-class discussion will happen on Facebook as you provide a brief response to the “quote” and information in the post and then applying that information to your ministry context. (If you do not work with a local church congregation at this time, you may answer the question by relating it to your current ministry context or to any local congregation with whom you are familiar, past or present.)

The purpose here will be to recognize the mental model at work in your congregation and reflect on how you would respond. Evaluation will be based on the level of understanding you reveal in your “Assignment Question” comment.

A Facebook comment allows you to edit or add information to your comment at any time.
(On a PC, look for three dots: … Click there and select “edit” to edit your comment.)
You can also reply to the comments of others.
If you have a question to ask me, please begin your comment with “QUESTION:” and I will respond. It’s OK to chase rabbits here!

Cultural Apologies: My awareness of Native American culture comes from several friendships with Native Americans. I want to confess and provide an apology in advance for any misunderstanding on my part which would bring an offense to any of you due to my ignorance of your culture. Please help me to learn from any mistakes.

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ITEMS OF INTEREST – MAY, 2019

ITEMS OF INTEREST – MAY, 2019

Click on the link below to go to the first post in the sequence so that they can be read in order. Each sequence addresses a topic, and the series of posts is like an article. The link to the next post in the series will be found in the lower right hand corner of each post.

AN ORIENTATION TO PASTORAL WORK – This sequence proposes a five-session “orientation to pastoral work” experienced over five months for new pastors in the Kaskaskia River District of the Illinois Great Rivers Conference of the United Methodist Church. Each session focuses on providing a specific, simple method for doing one aspect of the work of the pastor. Posts following the links below will explore that topic.

Session 1 – July: Orientation to Pastoral Work: PA.S.TO.R.  
Methodology (1st hour): Tasks: Time Management, setting up your personal organization system.
Application (2nd hour): Pastoral Expectations. PASTOR and SHALOM Working Templates.

Session 2 – August: TO: Tasks and Organization
Methodology: The Church as Organism and Organization; getting things done through other people.
Application: The Church as a Family of God, part 1. Church family systems, facilitating change.
District Office: 2 hour Training in completing Church Conference forms will follow this session.

Session 3 – September: S … R Preaching and Reading  
Methodology: Monroe’s Mountain: A System for Exegesis and Sermon Preparation.
Application: Organizing for Worship – purpose, goals, including laity, get the details right.

Session 4 – October: PA Pastoral Care and Attention  
Methodology: The Church as a Family of God, part 2. Soul mending and equipping the saints.
Application: Organizing for Healthy Communication. Building Community by “staying in touch.”

Session 5 – November: The Pastor’s Spiritual Life
Methodology: A Menu of Practical Spiritual Disciplines
Application: Organizing for Long Term Spiritual Health

——————————-

METRICS IN DISCIPLE MAKING – This sequence examines the use of equipping tracks (discipleship pathways) as a means of identifying and measuring effective activity in the making of disciples in the United Methodist Church.

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.
Please review the page How and Why We Use Quotes.

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Fall 2021 CLM Module 1 Homework Assignment #6 of 6

Subject: CLM Homework #6 of 6: The Ministry Orders

My Order for Ministry

Image: Anna Fox “Inside Hogwarts Castle” via Flickr

In the Harry Potter books, a new student at Hogwarts is “sorted” by the Sorting Hat into one of four “houses” – into the one that is the best fit for them. The Hogwarts School is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder: Godric Gryffindor, Helga Hufflepuff, Rowena Ravenclaw and Salazar Slytherin. Houses at Hogwarts are the living and learning communities for its students. (Wikipedia)

It would be nice if United Methodist people with a calling to ministry had a sorting hat!

The best we can do, I think, is to use some Sorting Questions to help us discern the “living and learning communities” that are best for us. Please circle your preference and your calling (if they aren’t the same, make a note of it!) to the following questions – we’ll discuss them Friday evening:

  1. I would rather serve as a volunteer in the church … or … I would rather serve as an employee of a church.
  2. In terms of hours would rather serve part-time (less than 40) … or … I would rather serve full time (more than 40 hours per week).
  3. I would love to take three years to go to Seminary … or … I would rather learn “on the job” through continuing education.
  4. I would prefer to find and choose my own job … or … have the Bishop send me where needed (itinerate).
  5. I would rather serve as a specialist in ministry (focused on serving part of a church or part of a community) … or … be a generalist and oversee the whole ministry of a church.
  6. I like serving as a part of a team … or … I like being independent and doing my own thing my own way.

A few questions for discussion …
What are the advantages and disadvantages of each preference?

We’ll discuss how your preferences can help “sort” you into various types of ministry service in the United Methodist Church.

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Fall 2021 CLM Module 1 Homework Assignment #5 of 6

Subject: CLM Homework #5 of 6: The Ministry Covenant

My Covenant for Ministry

When I graduated from Seminary in 1980, I was moving from an environment where my professors told me what to do, into an environment of full-time ministry that was very unstructured. What was I supposed to do?

My DS was not helpful – he told me in 1980 that ministers who work full time should put in a minimum of 72 hours per week.

I stumbled across a wonderful book, James D. Glasse’s classic “Putting It Together In The Parish.” In the book he describes a very helpful concept: Paying the Rent. The idea is that pastors have certain specific required tasks to do … they are like paying the rent. Once your rent is paid, you are secure and can stay in your apartment and the rest of your money is yours to do with as you wish. The “rent” is what you have to do or you get evicted.

Glasse speculated that most pastors could pay the rent in an average of 80% of their working hours. Once the rent was paid, they could voluntarily choose how to spend the rest of their working hours, investing in ministries that were very satisfying and rewarding.

Some pastors, Glasse noted, lived in the “high rent district” and served high expectation churches where it would take 50-60 hours every week just to pay the rent. Some pastors will serve comfortable churches where the rent is easy to pay, leaving a good amount of time to pursue your calling and what you find meaningful – hopefully, that will be you!

Some pastors do what they want to do first, all week long, and get farther and farther behind on the rent. Hopefully, that will not be you.

A “Mutual Ministry Covenant” is a little bit like a lease – you want to read the fine print before you sign it. You don’t want to sign it until the rent is clearly spelled out. If you don’t pay the rent, you will be evicted from your ministry job. Some items in the lease may need to change; some are not negotiable.

Some pastors don’t sign the lease, or don’t even know there is a lease, and discover that the rent is entirely different than what they thought, or that the rent keeps changing based on whichever wheel is squeaking that week.

The fine print in many pastoral leases often has just 7 words: If Mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy.

  • In some churches, Mama is the Minister … as if the church exists to serve the needs of the pastor and for the pastor to be happy.
  • In some churches, Mama is all the laity … as if the pastor is doing a good job only if everybody is happy.
  • In some churches, Mama is one grumpy member … and everyone but the new pastor knows who that is.

No one should sign a lease that is not clear. It’s for your protection. Read the lease before you sign it!!!

The most wonderful thing about being a Certified Lay Minister is that YOU get to develop the “lease” for paying your “pastoral rent” and then negotiate this with the local church.

We will spend a large part of our class time discussing what is a healthy Mutual Ministry Covenant. Your Mutual Ministry Covenant will include and describe your calling, your gifting, and everything we’ve discussed so far in terms of what you will do in the parish as a Certified Lay Minister.

Your homework assignment #5 this week is to review several examples of Mutual Ministry Covenants and begin to think of your own:

I. Covenant Community Church, UMC and Dottie Lloyd, Certified Lay Minister. Page 41 in your CLM materials.

  1. What are the strengths of this covenant? Why? What problems would it prevent or resolve?
  2. What are the weaknesses about this covenant? Why? What problems might arise?

II. Quimbly United Methodist church of Port Only, PA. Page 42 in your CLM materials.

  1. What are the strengths of this covenant? Why? What problems would it prevent or resolve?
  2. What are the weaknesses about this covenant? Why? What problems might arise?

III. IGRC Pastoral Expectations Document – download from this website:
https://www.igrc.org/files/tables/content/87405/fields/files/3256b0d8968641f58b870a1303f64cfa/2017+expectations+of+pastors+edited.pdf

THE PAGES ARE LAID OUT TO BE PRINTED and stapled into a booklet. Reading it as a PDF will make no sense.

This 18 page PDF file was written by the Cabinet to prevent conflicts over what the appointed clergy are expected to do. It has been a very useful document for me – I give it to my PPR committee and tell them that this is what I intend to do and to call me on any behavior contrary to what it says. Pages 2-9 are as close as you can get to a Ministry Covenant for appointed clergy.

As you read through it, what surprises you?

What elements of this document might be useful to include in your own Ministry Covenant?

IV. IGRC Model CLM Covenant – this will be a model for developing your own Mutual Ministry Covenant as you go through the program. You’ll work with this next year or later.

V. Give some thought to a Mutual Ministry Covenant for the calling you mentioned in Homework Assignment #4; make notes and work up a rough draft. We’ll share ideas back and forth on what should be a part of it. Please bring it with you to class as a rough draft for you to work on – not necessarily to share copies, although you could if you wish. Each of us will take a turn where you are the leader developing a covenant for the ministry you described in Assignment #4, and we are the members of your mutual ministry team helping you write our team covenant.

Homework Assignment # 6 will be a short discussion of the various “orders for ministry” and which one you feel may be your calling; it will arrive on Thursday or before. I’m looking forward to Friday!

Dave Kueker … blest to be your instructor.

But the wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, open to reason, full of mercy and good fruits, without uncertainty or insincerity. And the harvest of righteousness is sown in peace by those who make peace. James 3:17-18

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Fall 2021 CLM Module 1 Homework Assignment #4 of 6

Subject: CLM Homework #4 of 6 – My Team for Ministry.

My Team for Ministry

Bad joke:
What do you call a dog that has no legs?
Answer: it doesn’t matter what you call him he’s not going to come.

Your mutual ministry team is your arms and legs.
The body of Christ has arms and legs to do work and go places.
Who are your arms and legs?
If you don’t have them you are not going anywhere.


Jim Collins classic book on transformation in organizations entitled Good to Great suggests: first who, then what. Assemble the brightest, the most talented and the most committed people and THEN figure out what you are going to do. Start by gathering the best people, then work WITH them to develop the best plan. Quote:

First Who, Then What
The next factor that Collins identifies as part of the Good to Great process is the nature of the leadership team. Specifically, Collins advances the concept that the process of securing high-quality, high-talent individuals with Level 5 leadership abilities must be undertaken before an overarching strategy can be developed. With the right people in the right positions, Collins contends that many of the management problems that plague companies and sap valuable resources will automatically dissipate. As such, he argues, firms seeking to make the Good to Great transition may find it worthwhile to expend extra energy and time on personnel searches and decision-making.
http://www.wikisummaries.org/wiki/Good_to_Great:_Why_Some_Companies_Make_the_Leap…_and_Others_Don%27t


YOUR HOMEWORK:

It’s important to understand that as we do ministry, we work with the people who are there. We don’t usually get to handpick a team of superstars. What we do assume is that God has put the people in place needed to fulfill God’s will. The people you need for your team will be there. To practice building a team, however, we can contemplate who we would like to ask to be on our team.

So that will be our homework – choose one of the following scenarios and answer the questions:

  1. Consider your current district. If you were asked to start a new congregation, list seven people you’ve known throughout your life that you would like to have with you to help you as the church planting team.
    1.1 Who would you ask to come with you?
    1.2 What talents do they bring? Why did you choose them?
    1.3 Select a Pastor or Ministry professional who will be your expert consultant and mentor the project and the team.
  2. Consider your current church (or a church you know well from your past). Imagine you were asked to start a new ministry emphasis to a target population (example: youth, families with young children, the homeless, persons overcoming addictions, the unchurched, retired people – your ministry target population should refect your S.H.A.P.E. and calling.)
    2.1 What would be your target population?
    2.2 Who would be the four people from your current church that you would like to have with you to help you?
    2.3 Who would you ask to serve as a link to the church board and interpret your ministry to the rest of the congregation?
    2.4 Who would you ask to provide expertise and mentor the team and the project?
  3. Consider your current district and/or a church where you’ve been a leader. You are a lay leader in a large church in a county seat town of 15,000 that has been asked to adopt a United Methodist congregation in Banner, Illinois, a small village 8.4 miles away. They are the only church in the village which has a population of 250. The congregation consists of six elderly people who have been struggling to keep the church from closing. They are willing but exhausted; they need help. You’ve been asked by your pastor and District Superintendent to form a ministry team to function as the pastoral staff, providing ministry to the existing church and the community in order to revitalize the church. This is a two year commitment for the team. Your church is very excited about sending “missionaries” to help in Banner.
    3.1 Who are five people you would ask to come with you as volunteers?
    3.2 What talents do they bring? Why did you choose each person?
    3.3 Select an outside Pastor or Ministry professional who will be your expert consultant and mentor the project and the team. (In addition to the current pastor of “parent” church who will be the link to the District Superintendent.)

Some theory about ecclesiology (the theology of church) that is meaningful to me:

To me, the best definition of the church is what Paul writes about the body of Christ in 1 Corinthians 12.
EVERY member is gifted; the Spirit chooses your gift mix, not you.
Some are envious of the gifts of others.
Others look down on those who don’t have their gifts.
EVERYONE is connected … when one member suffers …
EVERY member is NECESSARY from God’s point of view.

The body of Christ is like a Kachina doll … bodies within bodies. Systems within systems. Teams within teams. In the Wesleyan movement, this is called Ecclesiolae en ecclesia … “little churches in the big church.” To me, each is a functional “body of Christ” within the bigger system.

From this perspective, we are connected as churches within churches …
The Illinois Great Rivers Conference is a 1000 point charge led by a Bishop.
The Kaskaskia River District is about a 75 point charge led by a Superintendent.
Kinmundy-Wesley United Methodist Church is a two-point charge led by Dave Kueker.
The youth group is a body within this body of Christ led by Mary Brimberry.
The Beth Moore class is a body within this body of Christ led by Kim Kueker.

And your Mutual Ministry Team is a body within the body of Christ which is the church to which you are assigned. All that is needed to fulfill God’s will is provided through the people God has provided. Matthew 18:20 For where two or three gather in my name, there am I with them.”

Teams differentiate within a common purpose …
Common unifying purpose: basketball team.
But players bring different skills: point guard, shooting guards, forwards, center … all differing, all differentiated.
On a losing team, everyone is identical.

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Fall 2021 CLM Module 1 Homework Assignment #3 of 6

Subject: CLM Homework #3 of 6 – My S.H.A.P.E. for ministry.

The purpose of the “homework” is to give us some advance preparation of what we will discuss when we meet in a week. So, no deadline, but as you have it. Please “reply all” and type your answers right into your email after the questions in bold and share it, as your answers will help others discover theirs. Or you can use the questions at the very bottom. (Or you can attach it as a word processing file, if you wish.) Thanks! Dave


My understanding of the church is what Paul describes in 1 Corinthians 12. Each of us is a part in the body of Christ. If you want to know your calling – what you are supposed to do – look at the way you are made. We have a God given “shape” and it reveals our purpose, in my opinion.

The problem Paul notes in 1 Corinthians 12, is that each part is envious and wants to be something other than what they are … or wants to look down on those who do not have their shape. Everyone’s shape has a value in the body of Christ.

In the Body of Christ, each part of the body functions according to the way it is designed by God in creation. What we do and how we do it is a part of how we are made; you are shaped for a purpose. Saddleback Church uses the acronym “SHAPE” to help people discern the ministry calling that God has on a person’s life – and I think it is a good model. So let’s talk about your “shape” for ministry – where you fit in. What part do you fulfill in the body of Christ?

  1. Have you taken a spiritual gift test previously? What did these tests say your gifts were? (Spiritual gift)
  2. All around us there are suffering people who are harassed and helpless. Which sort of person in need speaks to your heart? Who do you yearn to help? This is your ministry target population – your personal mission field – where your heart lies. This is your emotional neighborhood. (Heart)
  3. I believe that God prepares us to fulfill the calling God asks of us … we are prepared for the ministry that is asked of us. Our calling is not to fail but to fulfill God’s will. What abilities do you have that make you different from other people? What is difficult for others that you find easy to do? What skills do you have and how can you use them for God? (Ability)
  4. You also have a God given personality that comes complete with many preferences.
    What sort of person are you? What are your preferences? (Personality)
  5. In order to achieve God’s will, you will have many life experiences which will prepare you along the way to do what God wants you to do in the future. While we are frequently called out of our comfort zone, we find that God has prepared us with past experiences for what God calls us to do. What sort of experiences might have prepared you for Ministry? What have you had a lot of experience with in life? (Experience)

UNDERSTANDING OUR PREFERENCES

I’m a fan of the Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator … it helps us see what our preferences are in four categories:

Introvert or Extrovert? I or E? (being around people energizes you (E) or tires you after a while – you need alone time to be your best (I))

Sensing or Intuition? S or N? (detail oriented, checkbook balanced to the penny (S) or big picture, creative, poetry writing, day dreamer (N)

Thinking or Feeling? F or T? (analytical (T) or emotional “seat of the pants” (F) decision making)

“Judging” or Perceiving? J or P? (how to do a task: orderly, sequential, one thing at a time (J) or juggling multiple tasks, doing what’s interesting (P).

(I like to say that a “J” is like a surgeon, everything under control and perfection means doing it exactly the same way over and over again; Js are committed, reliable, responsible and excellent at doing things right every time. A “P” is like an emergency room doctor, ready for anything that happens next and finds the chaos a little exciting; they are excellent at solving unexpected problems when “the way we’ve always done it before” no longer works.)

A Myers-Briggs type – a combination of four letters – is neither good nor bad. It’s just a way of naming your preferences – vanilla, chocolate or strawberry ice cream. With or without sprinkles.

When you have identified your four letters, you can Google them to find all sorts of descriptions of that grouping out of the 16 possible combinations. Again, this is just generalizations about preferences … what you find might or might not be specifically true for you.

You can take a free version of this test here: https://openpsychometrics.org/tests/OEJTS/

(Many other similar tests are also available online. Please remember – our goal is to understand your preferences. Your four letter results might be different depending on how you feel that day, or on the test you took. They also can change as we age and grow. Mine have.)

And then we can explore your preferences. Simply Google your four letters. Do the descriptions you find fit how you perceive yourself? If the difference between the two choices is small, switch the letter and Google that – is that a better fit with your preferences?

I am convinced that the “body of Christ” described in 1 Corinthians 12 means that people need to be happy with who and how God made them – and this means that, generally speaking, your calling will be a good fit with your personality.

So please take the test and let me know your four letters – E or I, S or N, T or F, J or P.
What are your four letters?

For this homework assignment, please answer the questions below.

Pastor Dave

But the wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, open to reason, full of mercy and good fruits, without uncertainty or insincerity. And the harvest of righteousness is sown in peace by those who make peace. James 3:17-18

My S.H.A.P.E. Questions

  1. What did these tests say your gifts were?
  2. Which sort of person in need speaks to your heart? Who do you yearn to help?
  3. What abilities do you have that make you different from other people? What is difficult for others that you find easy to do? What skills do you have and how can you use them for God? (Ability)
  1. You also have a God given personality that comes complete with many preferences.
    What sort of person are you? What are your preferences? (Personality)
  2. What sort of experiences prepare you for Ministry? What have you had a lot of experience with in life? (Experience)

Dave Kueker`s answers to the S.H.A.P.E. Questions

  1. What did these tests say your gifts were?
    Apostle – organizing cooperation of Christians across local church boundaries. (Eph 4:11) (APEST test)
    Researcher, innovator – Architect of Ideas, develop a model, test it, improve it.
    Fascinated by new ideas that will help people, new methods to be more effective; especially evangelism and disciplemaking.
    Word of wisdom, word of knowledge, discernment.
  2. Which sort of person in need speaks to your heart? Who do you yearn to help?
    I am drawn to people who want to solve their problems and live a happier, more effective life (“going on to perfection”).
    I am drawn to people who are curious about ideas from the bible, from books, from reflecting on life and how to live a better life.
    I particularly love helping people discern how God wants to utilize their gifts in doing God’s will and working together. My vision of the best church possible is “We are a functional family of God, where Jesus is Lord and people grow.”

3.What abilities do you have that make you different from other people? What is difficult for others that you find easy to do? What skills do you have and how can you use them for God? (Ability)
People tell me that I am good at explaining complex ideas from the bible or from books in ways that people can understand them.
I think I am good at discerning and defining the problems and opportunities in a system.
I love being creative and organizing things, people and organizations, including organizing ideas into books, articles or presentations.
I like to think that I am a good guitar & bass player.

  1. You also have a God given personality that comes complete with many preferences.
    What sort of person are you? What are your preferences? (Personality)

My Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator letters are ENFP … with the P just slightly higher than the J. This means I like to walk into chaos and organize it my way so that everything runs smoothly and more effectively and everyone enjoys life.

When you have your four letters, you can google them to find all sorts of descriptions of that grouping out of the 16 possible combinations.
Again, this is just generalizations about preferences … what you find might or might not be specifically true for you.

Here’s a description of ENTP from Wikipedia: ENTPs are frequently described as clever, cerebrally and verbally quick, enthusiastic, outgoing, innovative, flexible, loyal, and resourceful. ENTPs are motivated by a desire to understand and improve the world they live in. They are usually accurate in sizing up a situation. They may have a perverse sense of humor and sometimes play devil’s advocate, which can create misunderstandings with friends, coworkers, and family. ENTPs are ingenious and adept at directing relationships between means and ends. ENTPs devise fresh, unexpected solutions to difficult problems. However, they are less interested in generating and following through with detailed plans than in generating ideas and possibilities. In a team environment, ENTPs are most effective in a role where they can draw on their abilities to offer deep understanding, a high degree of flexibility, and innovative solutions to problems. The ENTP regards a comment like “it can’t be done” as a personal challenge, and, if properly motivated, will spare no effort to discover a solution.

  1. What sort of experiences prepare you for Ministry? What have you had a lot of experience with in life? (Experience)
  • In my life, I’ve had a variety of experiences with adversity, which strengthen my desire to help people to overcome – from my youngest brother born handicapped with cerebral palsy when I was nine years old, when he died very suddenly at age 4 when I was 13, how that loss devastated my family in ways that I couldn’t see until I was in my 40s, through a very difficult divorce in 1998 while a pastor.
  • Starting in 3rd grade, I became an avid reader and my curiosity had led to lots of learning experiences and into creative writing and graduate school through a Doctor of Ministry degree awarded in 2008.
  • My appointments have largely been to blue collar congregations in working class communities where I work primarily with people who work hard to overcome their difficulties. Many aspects of mental illness have been a part of these communities as well.

MORE INFORMATION

If you are interested in the APEST Test, based on Ephesians 4:11, look here:
https://fivefoldministry.com/
http://www.theforgottenways.org/what-is-apest.aspx
Cost: $10. https://5qcentral.com/product/apest-vocational-assessment/

Another very useful test is the CliftonStrengths Assessment®. This assessment measures your talents — your natural patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving — and categorizes them into the 34 CliftonStrengths themes. For more information: https://www.gallup.com/cliftonstrengths/en/253676/how-cliftonstrengths-works.aspx

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Fall 2021 CLM Module 1 Homework Assignment #2 of 6

Subject: CLM Class – Homework Assignment #2 of 6.

My Story In Ministry

Seminary Professor Wayne Oates once said that Pastoral Care was “a conversation between two people for the benefit of one.” Whether our conversation is with one person or with many (as in a sermon), we are speaking for the benefit of the one who is listening.

In homework assignment #1, we shared information about ourselves as a way to get to know each other and as a way to build friendship and community with each other. In a ministry setting these sorts of conversations will frequently be used for the benefit of the other person. We will share our life experience with others in a variety of ways as we build healthy relationships.

In homework assignment #2, we shift from information about us to sharing information about our spiritual journey.

From time to time in our ministry we’ll be sharing our spiritual story … the description of how we understand God to be working in our life. That’s a conversation of a slightly different sort – a spiritual conversation – and we need to become comfortable having these conversations. The following discussion questions allow you to give some thought as to how you might speak of your own experience of God as you follow Jesus.

Just type a few sentences after each one … and it’s OK to say “I don’t know” or “I’ve never thought about that before.”

Tom Logsdon’s Disciple Making Questions

  1. A good way to bring your own spiritual journey into focus.
  2. When, where and from whom did you first learn about God?
  3. When, where and from whom did you first learn about Jesus?
  4. When, how and why did you accept Jesus Christ as your Lord and Savior?
  5. Who nurtured you in faith, particularly during those early tender years?
  6. Who have you shared the good news of Jesus Christ with? How did it go? What if anything would you repeat? And what you do differently?
  7. Who specifically should you be sharing your faith with now? Why?


MY SPIRITUAL ADVICE …

As a CLM, people will ask you for advice on how to strengthen their spiritual life and about the practice of spiritual disciplines. Imagine how you would answer some of the following questions that a church member might ask you one day after worship by sharing briefly in a couple of sentences what you find to be helpful. (Our own practice of spiritual disciplines helps us to stay balanced and healthy in the face of pressures that can overwhelm us.)

  1. How can I strengthen my prayer life? What is your advice?
  2. How can I strengthen my practice of meditation – of being still before the Lord and listening in prayer? What is your advice?
  3. How can I strengthen my practice of reading scripture? I want to get more out of what I read. What is your advice?
  4. What could I be reading other than the bible to strengthen me spiritually? What are you reading currently?
  5. What about journaling – of writing down my thoughts and what I feel God is telling me? What is your advice?
  6. What other spiritual disciplines would benefit me? Have they helped you?
  7. We aren’t always the best examples of what we suggest that others do. Are you willing to follow your own advice?

I’m someone who is good at giving advice, but not always good at follow-through. I’m going to save my answers for later, as I don’t want to imply that one method is more valuable than another. I look forward to learning more of your story …

Dave Kueker … blessed to be your instructor.

But the wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, open to reason, full of mercy and good fruits, without uncertainty or insincerity. And the harvest of righteousness is sown in peace by those who make peace. James 3:17-18

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Fall 2021 CLM Module 1 Homework Assignment #1 of 6

CLM Homework Emails –

CLM Module 1 – Homework Assignment #1 of 6: Getting to Know You

Dear friends:

I’m looking forward to our time together when we meet at Little Grassy for the Certified Lay Minister Module 1. Typically classes in college are spaced out with time in between that allows you to study after you spend class time with the teacher and also do homework between classes.

Our CLM class meets one time over Friday night, and Saturday morning and afternoon. This means we have to study prior to class and arrive ready to talk about we have read. Therefore we do homework in advance!

First, please let me know if you have had any difficulty downloading and printing the class “book” – Module One: Call and Covenant for Ministry. This is the new edition for 2016. Please read over the 55 pages, make note of questions you have in the margins and be ready to talk about it in our class.

In order to help us be ready when we arrive at Little Grassy, I’ll have 3 homework assignments a week which you’ll receive by email. They are not going to be difficult but are designed to encourage you to think deeply about this amazing model for ministry which we call the Certified Lay Minister. You just answer the questions I ask, responding as you would to any email.

The First Homework Assignment – the CLM model of ministry is one where we work as a team. All the books on management and leadership are beginning to understand what has been taught in the New Testament all along – we do better when we work as a team, when we know each other, are comfortable with each other, and where we feel that we can trust and rely on our teammates.

This is very different from the Lone Ranger style of ministry where you ride into town, save the day, but never get to know the people you are helping – you never take off your mask, and you leave before you really ever get to know the people. Our experience shows that this style of ministry chews up people and isn’t that beneficial for the church folks who are only consumers who sit quietly and watch the hero do all the work of saving them.

So … as we begin to study this CLM model of ministry, we’re going to also live it. Below you will find a list of questions that I designed to help my church members tell me more about their lives so that I could get to know them. Building community comes first.

Please “reply all” to this email – this will let the entire group know your answers and help us get to know each other – then put your cursor after each statement and finish the sentence with information about yourself. Don’t write a book, but feel free to express yourself. You can answer below, or copy the “Getting To Know You” statements to the top of your reply if you like.

Below these, you’ll find my answers … I might as well go first. If you have questions for me to privately answer, please email me. (Including “How do I ‘reply all’?”) Homework assignment #2 will arrive in your email on Wednesday.

Dave Kueker … blessed to be your instructor.

But the wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, open to reason, full of mercy and good fruits, without uncertainty or insincerity. And the harvest of righteousness is sown in peace by those who make peace. James 3:17-18

GETTING TO KNOW YOU:

A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another; even as I have loved you, that you also love one another. By this all men will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.” John 13:34-35

Help us get to know you better, so that we can do a better job of loving you as Jesus would! Please complete the sentences below and return to the pastor or the church office.

My name is …

I grew up in …

I went to school at …

I work (or worked before I retired) at …

These skills were important in my job there …

When people talk about sports, I have to talk about …

My family includes …

In my spare time I like to …

Something interesting that most people don’t know about me is that …

My favorite TV show is …

I’ll bet you didn’t know that I was related to …

I attend worship most Sundays at …

The thing I like most about my church is …

One question I’d like to ask God is …

What experiences helped to form you as a person?
(Hobbies, sports teams, military service, etc. )


DAVE KUEKER’S ANSWERS …

My name is … David Oliver Kueker (the last name is pronounced “Key-ker)

I grew up in … Belleville and Champaign, Illinois.

I went to school at …
Centennial High School in Champaign (Go Chargers!)
Eastern Illinois University (Go Panthers!)
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky (Go … uh… never mind)
Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California.

I work (or worked before I retired) at … Kinmundy and Wesley United Methodist Churches as the pastor. (Since July 1, 2014)

These skills were important in my job there … Preaching, pastoral care and administration/leadership.

When people talk about sports, I have to talk about … how little I know about sports!

My family includes … my wife Kim; three grown sons (Don in Chicago, Mike in Washington DC, and John and Crystal and granddaughters Damali & Lili in Austin, Texas); my brother and his family live in Dallas.

In my spare time I like to … read, read, read. Then buy more books.

Something interesting that most people don’t know about me is that … I participated 2005-2013 in NaNoWriMo, the National Novel Writing Month, where people attempt to write a 50,000 word novel in November. Fortunately, they don’t have to be good novels … if you finish, you win – www.nanowrimo.org.

My favorite TV show is … Whatever Kim is watching, as long as it is not too drama intense – not into soap operas, or any portrayal of suffering.

I’ll bet you didn’t know that I was related to … Col. Edmund Kueker, famous auctioneer in Waterloo, Illinois, whose collection of western memorabilia was the foundation for the Monroe County Historical Society museum.

I attend worship most Sundays at … Kinmundy First and Wesley United Methodist Churches, where I am the pastor.

The thing I like most about my church is … how nice they are to their pastor.

One question I’d like to ask God is … what exactly would Jesus do if he were a local church pastor?

What experiences helped to form you as a person? (Hobbies, sports teams, military service, etc. )
I played basketball until I retired as a high school sophomore; I was tall, but very, very slow.
I volunteered for service in the Air Force in 1975 but flunked the basic eye test. So I went to Seminary instead.
As a fifth grader, I became fascinated with designing ocean going sailboats and suburban homes.
At the age of 30 I became fascinated with computers and taught myself programming. I retired when Windows came out. Now I’m on Facebook, have a website and I blog.

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DiscipleWalk – Home Page

Walking with Jesus in the
School of Discipleship
Simple tools for making disciples for Jesus Christ

Churches fail to thrive when the priority of the Great Commission
is not present or is not central.

Note the fivefold purpose of the Elim Church of El Salvador memorized by
every member:

1. I have a purpose.
2. My purpose is winning souls.
3. I fulfill my purpose best in a group.
4. I will never be satisfied until I fulfill my purpose.
5. I have no promise of tomorrow.

Thriving churches do not believe in limits to growth, but rather believe, as
Jesus said, “The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few; pray therefore
the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest.”
(Luke 10:2)  The
harvest is ready; what is lacking are the laborers willing and ready to labor.

Members of the Elim Church who are experiencing dissatisfaction in their
church life are referred to line #2 and #4: I will never be satisfied until I fulfill my
purpose.  Neither will we in America.

Contact Information:
david (at)
disciplewalk (dot) com
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I’LL STAY WITH YOU July 1996 by Dave Kueker

I’LL STAY WITH YOU July 1996 by Dave Kueker
A Song for Weddings – (tune for verses: Abide with Me)

Walk down the aisle, and you will find me there.
Whenever you smile My heart’s as light as air.
With all the world’s sad sorrow, it doesn’t seem quite fair
That today, and every tomorrow,
We will always care.

As the preacher asks the question, I hear you say “I will”
Two little words that give me such a thrill.
They bring a warmth into life’s cold lonely chill.
I love you today,
Just as I always will.

Chorus
I’ll love you still — “I will!”
No matter what the years bring.
I’ll stay with you — “I do!”
My heart will always sing.
Through the laughter and tears,
Our love will last for years…
I’ll love you still.

Then comes the ring, and the words “I thee wed”
I swear by my life I will love you till I’m dead.
And then by the mercy of a God who’s always fair,
If I live in heaven, I will love you there.

Chorus

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Resources from ALS Preaching Class, 6/26/2021

As promised, here are links to resources from our ALS Preaching Class, 6/26/2021, at Effingham Centenary.

Participant’s text: From Pew to Pulpit by Clifton F. Guthrie ISBN 978-0-88177-375-0 • (Cokesbury) https://www.cokesbury.com/From-Pew-to-Pulpit?refq=guthrie

Teacher’s Book/Leader’s text: Called to Preach! by Dawn Chesser DRPDF876 • (PDF only)

Monroe’s Mountain – Slides from class presentation
Part 1: Presenting the message –
Part 2: Preparing the message –
Part 3: Using Powerpoint slides in the message – (you did not see this)

Blank worksheet to prepare the message (yellow handout): http://disciplewalk.com/files/Monroe_Mountain2.pdf

A handout on the original Monroe’s Motivated Sequence, courtesy of Ron St John, University of Hawaii, describing the goals for each step: http://disciplewalk.com/files/Ron_St._John_monroe_sequence_Handout.pdf

OPW = Orientation to Pastoral Work – PRACTICAL TIPS FOR PREACHING
https://ambidextrouschurch.com/2019/10/02/orientation-to-pastoral-work-session-3-september-15-2019/

Pink paper handout – Staying in touch with points on how Dawn Chesser would teach this class – based on her book Called to Preach! by Dawn Chesser:

Embarras River District Advanced Lay Servants Class – June 26, 2021 – Effingham Centenary
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1TjWKrbz6nXTH3BoZS38qP0dFvJmC_IkD/view?usp=sharing

Video by Barbara Sher about how, just as others have solution to your problem, others will have the ideas and illustrations to round out your message. She calls this an “Idea Party” …
Isolation is the dream-killer, not your attitude | Barbara Sher | TEDxPrague
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2rG4Dg6xyI

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What is the mental model of the GTD/NPM: Church-TO?

Focus:
GTD/NPM Focus: CHURCH – Orientation to Pastoral Work,
TO: Mark Forster + GTD Sorting = Flywheel

GTD – the Natural Planning Model
BORING: phoning it in.
EXCITING: I am on top of my work and GTD clear. I express my CliftonStrengths; I learn, see patterns and understand what to do.
HOPE:

Step 1: Defining Purpose and Principles
This was a fun one. I got out a blank sheet of paper and wrote at the top: “If I were to feel thrilled about my life each day, what would it look like?” I know this list could go on and on, but I tried to keep it simple, basically entailing things like having a healthy, clean environment, building strong relationships, spending my time on meaningful projects (that can only be done by me–delegating everything else), nurturing my mind, body, and spirit, and living a life filled with purpose.

Step 2: Outcome Visioning
As I looked over the list from Step 1, I started envisioning how this “new life” would be (and how it would not be) … Really seeing these things is empowering.

Step 3: Brainstorming
With this vision fresh on my mind, I started seven small mind maps–encapsulating all the actions and characteristics I want to translate into habits.

Step 4: Organizing
Here’s where I took all those principles, dreams, and brainstorms and translated them into a very doable list.

Step 5: Identifying Next Actions
Before placing these four items onto my “Current Projects” List, I identified my Next Actions and put them on my context-based list.

August 19 Reboot:

Tiny Habits:
Anchor: When I …
Behavior: I will …
Celebrate: And celebrate by …

1 Thing options for this area:

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