MODULE TWO: THE DIFFUSION OF INNOVATIONS ADOPTER FRAMEWORK

MODULE TWO: THE DIFFUSION OF INNOVATIONS ADOPTER FRAMEWORK

Section One: Overview

OBSERVATIONS, QUOTES AND ASSUMPTIONS: Agree or disagree?

A. The diffusion of innovations is a scientific approach to understanding resistance to change in cross-cultural settings ranging from the introduction of solar cookers for deforested regions in Africa[1] to the marketing of high technology. Change is slow even when the proposed change is highly positive and can easily fail to succeed.

B. Social systems and customer markets can be segmented by clear signature differences in those who adopt early and late in the process. Diffusion of innovations research identifies five adopter categories in a standard bell curve distribution from those who are first to adopt to those who adopt later. These five adopter categories are Innovators (2.5%), Early Adopters (13.5%), Middle Adopters (34%), Late Adopters (34%) and Laggards (16%).[2] Geoffrey Moore’s adaption of Diffusion theory to high tech marketing uses different terms for the same five categories: technology enthusiasts, visionaries, pragmatists, conservatives and skeptics.[3] Rogers also refers to Middle Adopters as the Early Majority and Late Adopters as the Late Majority. One could speak of Innovators and Early Adopters together as the visionary minority, and of the other categories together as the pragmatic majority.

QUOTE [1]

NOTE


DISCERNMENT QUESTIONS

RESOURCES

[1] The quote is a selection from David O. Kueker’s Fuller Seminary Doctor of Ministry project submitted in September, 2007, entitled Diagnosis, Dialogue, and Decision: A Threefold Process of Revitalization For the Illinois Great Rivers Conference.
It is shared here in recognition of its 12th Anniversary along with comments to update and provide perspective on the material. The original project was a Training Manual/Study Guide of three Seminars supported by three chapters of research and an Introduction. The material is available for download at www.disciplewalk.com/Resources.html. In 2009 it was provided for purchase as a softcover book entitled Designing Discipleship Systems: Christian Disciple Making For Any Size Church, Any Theology through CreateSpace.com.

[2][3] [4][5] [6][7] [8]

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. Please review the page How and Why We Use Quotes.



[1]Patrice M. Rodgers, Solar Box Cookers in Zimbabwe: The Introduction of a Radical Innovation in Cooking, (master’s thesis, University of California-Davis, 1994), http://solarcooking.org/zimb-the.htm (accessed June 15, 2007). Cf. Ramon Coyle, Solar Cooker Dissemination and Cultural Variables, http://solarcooking.org/advocacy/dissemination_and_culture.htm (accessed June 15, 2007).

[2]Everett Rogers, Diffusion of Innovations (New York: Free Press, 1995), 22.

[3]Moore, Crossing the Chasm, 30-38, 46-49, 54-59.

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