Laggards prefer the old ways and resent the encroachment of undesired change. The world changes anyway.

C. Laggards prefer the old ways and resent the encroachment of undesired change. The world changes anyway. One of the few environments where Laggards can prevent change and keep things as they once were is in the local church, especially in a small town. Therefore, contrary to Rogers, Laggards seek positions of power in churches in order to preserve the past.

D. As change cannot be prevented, Laggards are under continual pressure from current reality. Laggards experience others as pushing the trend. They are therefore frequently chronically anxious.[1]

E. When pushed, Laggards become anxious; when cornered, they can become violent. Laggards would “rather fight than switch.” Laggards often feel disrespected and are concerned with their honor and insults to their self esteem.[2] They often feel as if they have no option but to engage in defensive behavior that can easily escalate.


[1]Peter Steinke, Healthy Congregations: A Systems Approach (Herndon, VA: The Alban Institute, 1996), 54-67. Cf. Edwin H.

Friedman, Generation To Generation: Family Process in Church and Synagogue (New York: Guilford Publications, Inc., 1985), 35-39, 53-54, 212-214, 231-234.

[2]M. Scott Peck, “Self Love versus Self-Esteem,” in Further Along the Road Less Traveled: The Unending Journey Toward Spiritual Growth (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1993), 87-99.

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