TIME FOR BED

QUOTE: About this time, probably in 1728, he began that system of early rising which he continued till the end of his life. He used to awake every night about twelve or one, and remain awake some time. He felt convinced that he lay longer in bed than nature required, and procured an alarum which awoke him at seven next morning, nearly an hour earlier than the previous day. He still lay awake as usual. Next morning he rose at six, with the same result. The following night he set his alarum for five, but he awoke as before. The fourth day be rose at four, and slept all through the night. He could say, after sixty years, that he still rose at four o’clock, and that, taking the year round, he did not lie awake a quarter of an hour together in a month.t It must be remembered that in later years, after a long, wearisome ride on a hot day, Wesley would lie down and sleep for’ ten or fifteen minutes. He would then rise refreshed for his work. He never could bear to sleep on a soft bed.

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The quote above is from The Life of John Wesley by John Telford – Chapter4, EARLIER YEARS AT OXFORD, AND CURACY AT WROOTE, 1720—1729 and is found at http://wesley.nnu.edu/john-wesley/the-life-of-john-wesley-by-john-telford/the-life-of-john-wesley-by-john-telford-chapter-4/. Copyright © 1993-2011. Wesley Center for Applied Theology, c/o Northwest Nazarene University. All Rights Reserved.

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