ITEMS OF INTEREST – MAY, 2019

ITEMS OF INTEREST – MAY, 2019

Click on the link below to go to the first post in the sequence so that they can be read in order. Each sequence addresses a topic, and the series of posts is like an article. The link to the next post in the series will be found in the lower right hand corner of each post.

AN ORIENTATION TO PASTORAL WORK – This sequence proposes a five-session “orientation to pastoral work” experienced over five months for new pastors in the Kaskaskia River District of the Illinois Great Rivers Conference of the United Methodist Church. Each session focuses on providing a specific, simple method for doing one aspect of the work of the pastor. Posts following the links below will explore that topic.

Session 1 – July: Orientation to Pastoral Work: PA.S.TO.R.  
Methodology (1st hour): Tasks: Time Management, setting up your personal organization system.
Application (2nd hour): Pastoral Expectations. PASTOR and SHALOM Working Templates.

Session 2 – August: TO: Tasks and Organization
Methodology: The Church as Organism and Organization; getting things done through other people.
Application: The Church as a Family of God, part 1. Church family systems, facilitating change.
District Office: 2 hour Training in completing Church Conference forms will follow this session.

Session 3 – September: S … R Preaching and Reading  
Methodology: Monroe’s Mountain: A System for Exegesis and Sermon Preparation.
Application: Organizing for Worship – purpose, goals, including laity, get the details right.

Session 4 – October: PA Pastoral Care and Attention  
Methodology: The Church as a Family of God, part 2. Soul mending and equipping the saints.
Application: Organizing for Healthy Communication. Building Community by “staying in touch.”

Session 5 – November: The Pastor’s Spiritual Life
Methodology: A Menu of Practical Spiritual Disciplines
Application: Organizing for Long Term Spiritual Health

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METRICS IN DISCIPLE MAKING – This sequence examines the use of equipping tracks (discipleship pathways) as a means of identifying and measuring effective activity in the making of disciples in the United Methodist Church.

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.
Please review the page How and Why We Use Quotes.

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METRICS: THE FOUR CORNERED ROOM DISCIPLESHIP PATHWAY

JESUS has a discipleship pathway. It begins in Matthew 4:17 (Follow Me) and progresses step by step, command by command through Matthew 28:20: teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, to the close of the age.” Each command of Jesus is a step on the discipleship pathway. In order to have metrics, a way to measure progress on the discipleship pathway, it’s helpful to combine these individual steps into sections along the path. One such paradigm is known as the Four Cornered Room, which is a United Methodist version of the famous Saddleback Church baseball diamond.[1]

The Four Cornered Room suggests that the typical activities of an institutional church happen in the center of a large room, while the discipleship pathway is traveled counterclockwise around the walls of the room. In the center is worship and church governance/committees (Board, Staff, Trustees, Finance, Personnel, Church Office, etc.) People enter worship via the front door, at the center bottom in this illustration.[1] This dual representation of the traditional church (right hand) and the discipleship pathway (left hand) together are an ambidextrous church.

The discipleship pathway assumes that people go through stages of maturity similar to the basic developmental stages of human beings – infant, child, (puberty), teen and then adults as parents and grandparents. Each corner represents one of these four stages of maturity, and the walls between the corners represent a continuum of small groups which minister to persons flowing from one corner to the next, blending attributes as one corner flows into the next. Each activity in the local church has it’s own place, either in the center or along the wall, depending on its characteristics.[3]

Ministry in the discipleship system takes place in small groups. A person need not spend time in each small group in order, but must master the lessons of each corner in turn through participation in one or more groups. Developmental maturity is additive; the growing disciple continues to practice the lessons of each corner and typically continues to participate in each corner.

We can measure growth in discipleship by counting who is present in each corner of the discipleship pathway at the growing edge of their maturity as a disciple. These details are explained further in the Disciple Making 101 course materials, which can be found at www.disciplemaking101.com.

The first corner is the FELLOWSHIP CORNER, where people are loved and learn to love one another; this is the corner of the Great Commandment. In small groups in this corner people have fun and healthy relationships develop. This corner involves a quality of discipleship where newborns are completely dependent upon others for their care. The cry of the spiritual infant is “Pastor, I’m just not being fed …” Approximately 83% of church attenders are at this level of spirituality, entirely focused on getting their own needs met. And the lack of loving, planned nurture results in a “failure to thrive” beyond this point.

The second corner is the INTEREST CORNER, where people learn and grow in knowledge. The signature characteristic of the child stage of development is curiosity and an endless sequence of questions. In small groups in this corner, people learn about what interests them, which might be spiritual or might involve other sorts of classes, such as an exercise class, a book study on parenthood or a 12 step meeting like Alcoholics Anonymous.

The third corner is the SERVICE CORNER, where people discover and fulfill their missional calling, including their spiritual gifts. As people use their spiritual gifts, they exercise differentiation; like teenagers, they find themselves and begin their life’s work. They gravitate toward the corner which best represents their calling as leaders within the church, or to the ministries of worship or governance, or develop a ministry to the community outside of the church. Small groups in the service corner are teams that work together to do the work of the church inside the congregation or outside in the community.

Typically, there is a cultural Rite of Passage between the Interest and Service corner, an experience which facilitates a great leap of personal and spiritual growth. Children go away to the Rite of Passage, which is conducted by the elders of the tribe, and return to take their place as adults in the community. A Rite of Passage typically involves leaving home, becoming a part of a team on a great adventure, and returning with benefits to the community. Examples include the Walk to Emmaus, a mission trip or experiences like the Mardi Gras trip conducted by No Greater Love ministries (http://www.nogreaterlove.org/).

The fourth corner is the HARVEST WORKER CORNER, where disciple mentors watch over specific persons and help them to grow. Servant Leaders from the Servant Corner track attendance and participation in the corner where they serve as leaders and on the Rite of Passage; Harvest workers are involved in relationship building and ongoing mentoring, and particularly in helping specific persons make a transition to the next stage of their growth. Harvest workers use the Prayer Tool to maintain ongoing mentoring relationships with persons outside of the church and inside the church as they go around the four corners in order.

METRICS: To measure growth in the discipleship pathway, just count the people involved in each corner. (Harvest workers monitor their people for readiness to move to the next corner.)

What groups for fun and fellowship happen in your congregation on a regular basis? Who attends them? How many people who attend worship are not yet participating in one of these and developing relationships? Everyone needs to be connected beyond worship.

What groups for learning and personal growth happen in your congregation on a regular basis? Who attends them? How many people who attend fellowship events are not yet participating in one of these and learning together? (The sign that people are ready for this corner is that they are asking lots of questions.)

Who is exhibiting unrest or conflict in learning groups, as if they have outgrown this stage? Spiritual teenagers want to “do” rather than just discuss; they often want attention and want to feel special. Are they ready for the adventure of the Rite of Passage?

What is your congregation’s preferred Rite of Passage? How many have gone through that experience? How many are ready to go for the first time? Who are leaders for the Rite of Passage?

What teams for missional serving form in your congregation on a regular basis? Who participates on them? Are they open to new workers? How many people in your congregation can name their spiritual gift? How many can identify their calling to serve? (People who cannot identify their gift after exploration are probably focused on the traditional activities of the church – it’s possible that their gift is designed to meet the needs of unchurched persons outside in the community.)[4]

Who is willing to focus on a ministry with specific individuals, up to twelve, and watch over them as spiritual parents? With the Prayer Tool, you seek God in prayer over your neighbors in your social network to discover one new person each month you are called to mentor, and you agree to pray for them daily, touch base with them weekly, invite them to something that deepens the relationship monthly, and evaluate whether you should continue to mentor them annually.

When someone you mentor begins to use the Prayer Tool to mentor others, you become a spiritual grandparent, like Paul to Timothy. Twelve persons using the Prayer Tool provide a mentoring influence over 144 persons; twelve groups of twelve provide a mentoring influence of up to 1,728 persons in the community in a network of Christian love inside and outside of the local church.[5]

SIDE DOOR: As Harvest Workers use the Prayer Tool to invite monthly, small groups in each of the corners can also provide entry as “side doors” into the congregation and form relationships. A person who regularly attends fellowship, a class or serves on a team will inevitably attend worship due to the network of relationships. (The primary difference in the gigantic third world cell churches that fuels growth is that people attend the cell first, and then later come to worship with their cell.)

Groups can also work together to open side doors. A weekly Sunday School class (Interest Corner) can plan a monthly party for friends and neighbors to attend (Fellowship Corner) and a quarterly service project in the community (Missional, Service Corner). Relationships formed in these activities will increase participation in every corner.

RESOURCES

[1] “The Process of Growing and Sharing the Christian Life,” Great Plains Conference, https://www.greatplainsumc.org/lctdetail/1094447

[2] David Kueker, “A New Way of Making Disciples: Using the Left Hand,”
https://www.beadisciple.com/blog/a-new-way-of-making-disciples-using-the-left-hand/

[3] See page 33-41 in “Seminar One: Diagnosis” at http://www.disciplewalk.com/Resources.html for an explanation of each growth stage.

[4] Disciplemaking101 prefers the Saddleback Church understanding of spiritual gifts, as how God “SHAPEs” you for ministry through your Spiritual gift, your Heart, your Abilities, your Personality and equipped by your Experience. Cf. Eric Rees, S.H.A.P.E.: Finding and Fulfilling Your Unique Purpose for Life or try the online test at https://www.freeshapetest.com/. Gift tests that are limited to spiritual gifts identified in scripture violate the principle of differentiation in the body of Christ as identified in 1 Corinthians 12; we are meant to be stewards of whatever we have received.

[5] For more information on the Prayer Tool, view the materials for Module 4: The Prayer Tool at the Download Class Materials link at www.DiscipleMaking101.com. Two Audio presentations with Slides on using the Prayer Tool for Ambidextrous disciple-making are available at http://www.disciplewalk.com/PPT_Presentations.html.


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METRICS: What is a DISCIPLESHIP PATHWAY?

Craig Miller defines a faith community as made up of two cooperative, interacting components: worship and a discipleship system;[1]

The primary evangelistic strategy of the 21st century is the establishment of new faith communities . . . A faith community is created when a worship experience is tied to a discipleship system. A worshiping group without a discipleship system is not a faith community; it is simply a place to worship God. A faith community intentionally creates settings that link worship to discipleship and spiritual formation.[2] The primary purpose of this community is to reach out to new people to offer them experience of the grace of God that can transform them into disciples of Christ.

One of the critical steps for turning around an existing congregation is to evaluate and improve its current discipleship system. The way to approach the development of a discipleship system in either case – a new church or an existing congregation – is to ask: ‘What does our faith community need to offer to help a person reach spiritual maturity in the first three years of being a part of the faith community?'”[3]

A WARNING … be careful of merely asking people how they would define a disciple or what they consider to be the proper discipleship pathway. If your congregation is shrinking, it’s likely that your definition of a discipleship pathway will be unhelpful or unhealthy.

JESUS has a discipleship pathway. It begins here: Matthew 4:17 From that time Jesus began to preach, saying, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.” 18 As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon who is called Peter and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea; for they were fishermen. 19 And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men.” The discipleship pathway concludes here with this final instruction: Matthew 28:18 And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. 19 Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, to the close of the age.”

Every command of Jesus between these two verses is a step along the discipleship pathway. The end result of the discipleship pathway is a disciple who makes disciples, because obeying the Great Commission is an essential part of being a disciple. For every step you name along your discipleship pathway, there should be a verse from the gospels that supports that behavior … because disciples learn, observe and teach observance of the commands of Jesus.

SO … HOW do we measure discipleship? What are the metrics of a discipleship pathway? If a discipleship pathway is a sequence of steps which follow one after another by which one becomes a disciple, grows to become a better disciple, and eventually becomes a disciple maker, it should be easy to measure. There is a simple critical path which should be easy to follow through all the busyness of the church; avoid tangents and detours by focusing on the destination, which is to become a fully equipped maker of disciples.

Just identify the steps in sections, and count the people on each step.

Reflection Questions: Yes … or … no?

1. Is your church “simply a place to worship God”? Is worship the priority?

2. Is the primary purpose of your local church “to reach out to new people to offer them experience of the grace of God that can transform them into disciples of Christ”? Does your budget show this priority in spending? Does your church calendar show this priority in church activity? Where are the majority of funds and time expended in the life of your local church?

3. How would your church answer this question: ‘What does our faith community need to offer to help a person reach spiritual maturity in the first three years of being a part of the faith community?’

4. Who is making disciples now in your congregation? C. Peter Wagner suggests that 5% to 10% of church attenders have the spiritual gift of evangelism.[4] How many would that be, based on your average church attendance? Do you know who they are?


SOURCES

[1]Craig Kennet Miller, NextChurch.Now: Creating New Faith Communities (Nashville: Discipleship Resources, 2000), 114, 116. Balancing the dual aspects of the large group worship service and a discipleship system of cells in a “two winged church” is a major emphasis of cell church author Bill Beckham, The Second Reformation: Reshaping the Church for the 21st Century (Houston: Touch Publications, 1995).

[2]Craig Miller, NextChurch.Now, 6; see also 50-51. (Emphasis mine.)

[3]Craig Kennet Miller, NextChurch.Now: Creating New Faith Communities (Nashville: Discipleship Resources, 2000), 114, 116, 108. (Emphasis mine.)

[4] Christian A. Schwarz, Natural Church Development: A Guide to Eight Essential Qualities of Healthy Churches (St. Charles, IL: ChurchSmart Resources, 1996), 34-35.

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METRICS: JUMP GROUPS for Making Disciples

JUMP Groups are an adaptation for United Methodists of Neil Cole’s methods of organic church evangelism, from Cole’s Organic Church Planting Greenhouses training, Life Transformation Groups and methods of systematic prayer for the lost. [1]

JUMP is an acronym for Jesus Understands My Problems. [2] The purpose of a JUMP Group is evangelism followed by spiritual formation. JUMP Groups believe that there are two kinds of people in this world: people who need to become disciples, and disciples who need to become disciple makers. A JUMP Group begins as two people join together to seek and make a disciple, then three people seek a fourth. Soon after a group grows to four, it becomes two groups of two seeking to make a third disciple.

JUMP Groups evangelize exclusively through the use of disciple makers working the pattern of Jesus; consequently, nothing in the institutional church itself needs to change. Other than prophetically cleansing the Temple (twice), Jesus proposed no changes in temple worship, liturgy, music, hospitality or facilities. Jesus did not lead worship or preach in the temple. Jesus did not serve on the Sanhedrin or participate in Temple politics. Jesus utilized the Temple but did not seek to change it during his life. Consequently, JUMP groups will work in any size church, in any location, with any style of worship and within any theological tradition from conservative to liberal, from high church to Pentecostal. If disciples make disciples, the institutional church does not need to change because the institutional church does not make disciples.

JUMP Groups utilize five tools for making disciples that make disciples that make disciples:

FULL CONVERSION PRAYER: JUMP Groups use the Centering Prayer or one like it to begin daily devotion or the weekly meeting: Lord Jesus, today I am far less than the person I want to be or can be with your help. I ask today that you would be more and more the center of my life. Guide me to all that is good, cleanse me from all that is not. Teach me Your ways and form in me Your nature. Help me to serve you as I am gifted. Help me to notice my neighbor; work through me to redeem my neighborhood. I am a sinner; please be my Shepherd, my Savior, and my Lord. Full conversion of life (conversatio morum) implies growth through each stage to the point of being a disciple who makes disciples who make disciples.

PARTNERSHIP: Disciple makers are spiritual mentors. They help new disciple makers reach out to others. The Great Commission calls for partners to both make disciples and teach them to observe all that Jesus has commanded them. This is an interpersonal process.

BIBLE READING: Jesus defines a disciple as one who “continues in his word” – John 8:32. JUMP Groups systematically read a book of the Bible together, especially the Gospels, seeking to discern in the words what Jesus desires them to do in obedience. The goal is to read 28 chapters a week in a particular book. A group might read Matthew in a week (28 chapters), or Colossians 7 times in a week (4 chapters).

QUESTIONS: JUMP Groups meet weekly and use Questions to focus their efforts on growing as a disciple and in making disciples. (Neil Cole’s LTGs are modeled on John Wesley’s Bands; both use questions.)

THE PRAYER TOOL organizes systematic prayer and evangelism of up to 12 neighbors through daily prayer, weekly conversations, monthly relationship building invitations and an annual evaluation. A disciple-maker hopes to add one person a month for a maximum of 12.

METRICS:

What is your average worship attendance: _____

Per missiologist C. Peter Wagner, typically between 5% to 10% of your worship attenders have the spiritual gift of evangelism.[3] How many is that? @5%: _____ to 10% _____.

Who are they?

How many persons in your congregation are using The Prayer Tool to systematically pray for and evangelize their neighbors?

What is the potential ongoing impact of evangelization in your community through The Prayer Tool at this time: # of persons using The Prayer Tool _____ x 12 = _______.

How many persons are being prayed for this week by persons in your congregation using The Prayer Tool to systematically pray for and evangelize their neighbors? _____

How many persons are participating in spiritual partnership and supervision through meeting as JUMP Groups this week? _____

Who are they?

How many chapters of the Bible are being read each week by members of your congregation? (Collect this by asking persons to write their names, the Bible book and the number of chapters read each week on a clipboard in the front pew. Celebrate this number.) _____

RESOURCES:

[1] Neil Cole: https://www.cmaresources.org/ Organic Church Planting Greenhouse training: https://www.cmaresources.org/greenhouse. Book, Cultivating a Life for God
https://www.cmaresources.org/cjultivating-a-life-for-god.

Understanding the differing paradigms: Coming and Going: Two leaders. One mission. Two very different strategies. by Skye Jethani and Brandon O’Brien,
https://www.christianitytoday.com/pastors/2008/fall/11.34.html

[2] The Jump Group Brochure can be downloaded here: http://www.disciplewalk.com/Resources.html. Seminar Three details the implementation of JUMP Groups within a congregation.

[3] Christian A. Schwarz, Natural Church Development: A Guide to Eight Essential Qualities of Healthy Churches (St. Charles, IL: ChurchSmart Resources, 1996), 34-35.

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Annual Calendar UMC

JANUARY

Gather end of year information for reporting church statistics. Begin planning for Lent.

FEBRUARY

MARCH

Deadline for EZRA church statistical reports: March 31. Begin planning for Easter.

APRIL

Begin planning for special Sundays: Mother’s Day, Memorial Day, Pentecost, Father’s Day

MAY

1st Thursday in May: National Day of Prayer

JUNE

Illinois Great Rivers Annual Conference takes place in Peoria, IL

JULY

Clergy vacation renews. Did you use all your vacation days in the previous six months?

AUGUST

Begin planning for fall church conference and distribute church conference reports to lay leaders for input. Begin working on next year’s budget.

SEPTEMBER

Begin planning for Advent and Christmas.

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

THE CHRISTIAN YEAR

RESOURCES

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. Quotes “From The Book of Discipline of The United Methodist Church—2016 [are] Copyright © 2016 by The United Methodist Publishing House. Used by permission.” Please review the page How and Why We Use Quotes.

These blog posts attempt to provide a practical, helpful orientation to pastoral work in the United Methodist church for persons beginning their ministry, particularly laypersons supplying smaller churches. Like all free advice, they are intended to begin a conversation, should be prayed over carefully and thoughtfully applied after thinking them through.

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Additional Topics, Orientation to Pastoral Work, Class #5 of 5: Session 5 – November: The Pastor’s Spiritual Life

Additional Topics, Orientation to Pastoral Work, Class #5 of 5: Session 5 – November: The Pastor’s Spiritual Life

Other posts will be added to provide useful information for this section of the class. Topics may include:

 

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Your suggestions and questions will help improve the class and are welcome in the comment section below.

These blog posts attempt to provide a practical, helpful orientation to pastoral work in the Kaskaskia River District, Illinois Great Rivers Conference of the United Methodist church for persons beginning their ministry, particularly laypersons supplying smaller churches. Like all free advice, they are intended to begin a conversation, should be prayed over carefully and thoughtfully applied after thinking them through.

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Orientation to Pastoral Work, Class #5 of 5: The Pastor’s Spiritual Life

Class #5. The Pastor’s Spiritual Life (November)
Methodology:
A Menu of Practical Spiritual Disciplines

Application: Organizing for Long Term Spiritual Health
– Ministry is a marathon.
– Fulfill your Calling, Sabbath, prayer life, discernment, etc. Finishing well.
– “What is God doing here and how can I cooperate with God?”

Outcome: within one month, when requested, you will be able to explain to your DS or mentor your personal systems of reading the Bible devotionally, systematic prayer, show your personal journal and your progress in writing in keeping your commitments to caring for your own spiritual life.

RESOURCES

Textbooks: Book of Discipline and Pastoral Expectations (IGRC booklet)

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. Quotes “From The Book of Discipline of The United Methodist Church—2016 [are] Copyright © 2016 by The United Methodist Publishing House. Used by permission.” Please review the page How and Why We Use Quotes.

These blog posts attempt to provide a practical, helpful orientation to pastoral work in the Kaskaskia River District, Illinois Great Rivers Conference of the United Methodist Church for persons beginning their ministry, particularly laypersons supplying smaller churches. Like all free advice, they are intended to begin a conversation, should be prayed over carefully and thoughtfully applied after thinking them through.

To read the next post in this series, click on the link to the right and above the title of this post.

Months off: June and December.

January through May, the five sessions of Disciple Making 101 are offered with a focus on helping pastors implement an effective discipleship system in their local congregation both to make disciples and organize laity in disciple making.

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Additional Topics, Orientation to Pastoral Work, Class #4 of 5: Session 4 – October: PA Pastoral Care and Attention

Additional Topics, Orientation to Pastoral Work, Class #4 of 5: Session 4 – October: PA Pastoral Care and Attention

Other posts will be added to provide useful information for this section of the class. Topics may include:

 

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Your suggestions and questions will help improve the class and are welcome in the comment section below.

These blog posts attempt to provide a practical, helpful orientation to pastoral work in the Kaskaskia River District, Illinois Great Rivers Conference of the United Methodist church for persons beginning their ministry, particularly laypersons supplying smaller churches. Like all free advice, they are intended to begin a conversation, should be prayed over carefully and thoughtfully applied after thinking them through.

To read the next post in this series, click on the link to the right and above the title of this post.

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Orientation to Pastoral Work, Class #4 of 5: Pastoral Care and Attention

Class #4. PA Pastoral Care and Attention (October)
Methodology:
The Church as a Family of God, part 2.

  • The church as a “functional family of God where Jesus is Lord and people grow.”
  • “mending” the nets and “equipping” the saints – καταρτισμoν = “perfecting”
  • Responding to human pain; personal detachment and “a nonanxious presence”
  • Recognizing dysfunction, addiction, family roles, systemic problems.
  • Community building (Peck) and congregational health; the outcome of listening.

Application: Organizing for Healthy Communication
Organizing for Pastoral Care: respond to crisis methodically.
Supportive Listening instead of problem-solving. Pastoral support is NOT counseling.
Attention builds community; “howdy” calls, “walk slowly through the crowd.”
Organizing “staying in touch” ministries.
Specific stress transitions: death, funerals, grief, child birth, weddings, divorce
“We are a functional family of God where Jesus is Lord and people grow.”
Building community by paying Attention to people: methods of contact and building community: Phone calls, visits, office visits, Facebook, cards, letters, email, etc.
“Safe Sanctuaries” concerns. Healthy boundaries.

Outcome: within one month, when requested, you will be able to explain your personal pastoral care system to your DS or mentor, and show your work in the form of written checklists and processes to pastorally “keep in touch” with the congregation and community.

RESOURCES

Textbooks: Book of Discipline and Pastoral Expectations (IGRC booklet)

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. Quotes “From The Book of Discipline of The United Methodist Church—2016 [are] Copyright © 2016 by The United Methodist Publishing House. Used by permission.” Please review the page How and Why We Use Quotes.

These blog posts attempt to provide a practical, helpful orientation to pastoral work in the Kaskaskia River District, Illinois Great Rivers Conference of the United Methodist Church for persons beginning their ministry, particularly laypersons supplying smaller churches. Like all free advice, they are intended to begin a conversation, should be prayed over carefully and thoughtfully applied after thinking them through.

To read the next post in this series, click on the link to the right and above the title of this post.

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Additional Topics, Orientation to Pastoral Work, Class #3 of 5: Session 3 – September: S … R Preaching and Reading

Additional Topics, Orientation to Pastoral Work, Class #3 of 5: Session 3 – September: S … R Preaching and Reading

Other posts will be added to provide useful information for this section of the class. Topics may include:

 

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Your suggestions and questions will help improve the class and are welcome in the comment section below.

These blog posts attempt to provide a practical, helpful orientation to pastoral work in the Kaskaskia River District, Illinois Great Rivers Conference of the United Methodist church for persons beginning their ministry, particularly laypersons supplying smaller churches. Like all free advice, they are intended to begin a conversation, should be prayed over carefully and thoughtfully applied after thinking them through.

To read the next post in this series, click on the link to the right and above the title of this post.

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